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KUKA Robots in Bread Production

 KUKA Robots in Bread Production

Description

KUKA is a German company of industrial robots. It offers a comprehensive range of industrial robots and solutions for factory automation. It has been maintained by the Chinese company Midea Group since 2016. KUKA Robotics Corporation has normally 25 sales and service subsidiaries worldwide. These are located within the United States, Australia, Canada, Mexico, Brazil, China, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, India, Russia and most European countries.

A division of KUKA the KUKA Systems GmbH is a global dealer of engineering services and flexible automated manufacturing solutions. It has around 3,900 employees in twelve countries globally. Numerous automotive manufacturers are using the KUKA Systems’ plants and equipment’s for instance BMW, GM, Chrysler, Ford, Volvo, Volkswagen, Daimler AG, and Valmet Automotive. The manufacturers from other industrial sectors are also using products and services of KUKA for example Airbus, Astrium, Siemens and others. The variety includes for task automation in the industrial processing of metallic and non-metallic materials for many industries with aerospace, automotive, rail vehicles, energy, and agricultural machinery.

Company organization

  • Established in: 1898

  • Founders: Johann Josef Keller and Jacob Knappich

  • Headquarter: Augsburg, Germany

  • Employed more than 13,000 workers

  • Official corporate color: KUKA Orange

  • There are 5 divisions of company:

  1. Systems

  2. Robotics

  3. Swisslog Logistics Automation

  4. Swisslog Healthcare

  5. China

Remarkable highlights​

1971: Built Europe's first welding transfer line for Daimler-Benz.

1973: Six electromechanically driven axes world’s first industrial robot FAMULS.

1976: IR 6/60 new robot type with six electromechanically driven axes & an offset wrist.

1989: Developed new generation industrial robots such that brushless drive motors for a low maintenance and a higher technical availability.

2004: Released the first Cobot KUKA LBR 3.

2007: Biggest and strongest industrial robot with six axes KUKA Titan.

2010: The robot series as the only robot family, KR QUANTEC.

2012: Launched the new small robot series KR AGILUS.

2014: The Company expanded certain recognition with the general public.

2017: An artist Nigel Stanford deeply featured KUKA robot in a music video.

Application sections​

The industrial robots are being used in many application areas. The key application units are material handling, palletizing and depalletizing, loading and unloading of machines, spot and arc welding. Detailed applications include:

Transportation industry: 

Transport of heavy loads wherever their load capacity and free positioning are used.  

Food and beverage industry: 

Packaging machines loading and unloading, stacking and palletizing, cutting meat, and quality control.  

Construction industry:  

Practice in the construction industry to ensure an even flow of material. 

Glass industry: 

Use in bending and forming operations, also in the thermal treatment of glass and quartz glass in laboratory glass production.  

Foundry and forging industry:  

Heat and dirt resistance robots allow them to be used directly on the casting machines. They may also be used for operations for example deburring, grinding, or drilling, and for quality control.

Wood industry:

Use for grinding, milling, drilling, sawing, palletizing or sorting applications.

Metal processing:

Industrial robots are being used in welding, assembly, loading and unloading processes. They are also used for operations for instance milling, drilling, sawing or bending and punching.

Stone processing:

Industrial robots are being used for bridge sawing in the ceramic and stone industries.

KUKA and Infosys Industry 4.0 Partnership

KUKA Aktiengesellschaft and a worldwide leader in consulting, outsourcing, technology, and next generation services the Infosys (NYSE: INFY) had announced in 2016 plans to mutually develop solutions to support companies embracing Industry 4.0.

The aim of the collaboration is that the development of a software platform which would permit customers to gather, evaluate and utilize data for improving their own processes. By establishing an Industry 4.0 Cloud Platform the KUKA would do work to upsurge the connection of machines with the Cloud. These software and services are successful to be developed by a recently established subsidiary of KUKA, connyun.

Industry 4.0: machines and robots in the cloud

The central position in the production of the future is industrial robots and machines. They play the key role in Industry 4.0 in addition the cloud. They obtain information from the cloud as flexible elements in production. They report back to the cloud about the experiences learned during the production process. Here the optimization and documentation are accepted and the quality is guaranteed. KUKA deals the cloud solutions essential for this from a single source. They permit both robots and machine tools end to end with additional devices in production to be linked to the KUKA Cloud.

Key component of Industry 4.0 the Robots

The robots are a key element of industry 4.0 nowadays. They are providing answers to the main questions of our times with new production methods. In the way of the internet and IT, the progression of robotics would enduringly change the world. This is obvious that robots will become lesser, extra mobile, networked and cognitive. They will go together with us in each area of our daily lives.

Industry 4.0 at KUKA

Extra value results from the interdisciplinary interaction amid a wide range of diverse fields of skill at KUKA. These comprise their technological expertise in the web, the cloud and mobile platforms as concerns the Internet of Things and Industry 4.0.These parts combine with its current core capabilities in mechatronics and automation. They are by now making intelligent production solutions which overcome the fences existing regarding the digital world and the real world. This excellent customer added value is exemplified in what they call "Orange Intelligenz". I’m sharing a video in this article;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pQwMEjiYLGg&list=PLbJ9jyGXruZdI9aMlprTZ20PY7zet1isZ&index=3

This displays an excellent technology of industry4.0. This video shows KUKA robots doing amazing automation in a bread production plant. The robots are integrated in the bread production process making the entire operation more efficient.

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